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20131028
20131105
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device tax on an industry that represents about two-and-a-half percent of our gross domestic product in massachusetts that will cost jobs here in massachusetts. one of the problems is what we did in massachusetts was tailored to our population. it took advantage of health care and a number of different things, one of them, steve, was the fact that we had merged the non-group market with the individual market to try to spread out risks. what does the federal plan do? well, it reduces the number of rating factors we can use to evaluate risk for that pool. it's undermine wack we want to do. in fact, we have pleaded with our governor, governor patrick has asked the federal government, give us a waiver so that we can evaluate and price risk fairly and yet we now are going to be forced to use 4 rating factors as opposed to 106789 that's one of the major points of distinction here, massachusetts plan worked because it was designed for pennsylvania. we had expertise, for instance, in pricing risks. we had growth markets in medical devices. yet, when we look at what's happening at the federal
. >> for californians who work hard, pay taxes and obey the laws, i'm suing to force the federal government to control the border. and i'm working to deny state services to illegal immigrants. enough is enough. >> governor pete wilson. >> hard line immigration rhetoric. it is standard fare in republican primaries today. in 1994, this was something kind of new. in a way wilson and his fellow california republicans pioneered its modern use. 1994 was the year they put proposition 187 on the ballot, which sought to ban illegal immigrants and children from receiving state services including health care and public education. and it was political gold, proposition 187 passed, and pete wilson came from behind to win by double digits. it was also, for wilson and california republicans, the beginning of the end. california was a changing state, in the midst of a demographic overhaul. california of 1994 was barely one quarter latino, today that number is around 40%, back then fewer than 10% of the state was asian-american. today it is nearly 15%. 27% of the state's residents are foreign born. california is now o
Search Results 0 to 1 of about 2